How to replace or repair EM pinball latch relay parts/articulating arm/rollers

Ok, that’s a mouthful huh? This is a continuation of a previous series of videos I’ve done on fixing deep ruleset issues in EM games, and now that we’ve found what’s wrong, let’s fix it!

First, here’s a video on how to replace the latch relay – there’s another post where I demonstrate how to remove the backplane from the game so it’s easier to work on.

And in this next video, if you don’t have a replacement part, I show how with a little ingenuity and a #4 tap, you can fabricate your own roller for the articulating arm.

Now that it’s fixed… let’s see how the game plays!

How to remove the inside/backplane from an EM pinball machine?

Sometimes when you have to do more extensive work to relays in an old electro-mechanical game, you can’t bend over the cabinet. You need to get all those assemblies on a bench to service. I go over how you can remove the insides of a game so you can more easily access the components.

The next video in this series goes into repairing a broken latch relay.

The backplane (bottom panel) is typically held in place by a few specific things that need to be un-bolted before it can be removed: Several bolts on the panel itself, then some Jones plugs that attach to the wiring harness going to the playfield and backbox, then the power button, and finally, the board holding the tilt/plumb bob and Jones plug going to the coin door.
The tilt board is removed with a few screws, then detach the coin door Jones plug.
Also don’t forget the power cable has to go too, which may require unbolting the head to pull it through the inside.

Diagnosing gameplay issues on EM pinball machines (Target Pool)

This is a fun video that I think is quite informative. I go over the process of how I discovered a feature in the game was not working. It’s a good example of how even supposedly “fully-working” games are often not fully working and many people don’t realize.

So what do you do when you discover a play feature isn’t working? I go over how we can diagnose and identify/fix the problem, even without having schematics. Check it out!

Pinball Showcase: 1969 Gottlieb “Target Pool”

This is a very fun game that I recently dragged back to my house to work on. It was being a bit cranky and I finally got a chance to fiddle with it and get it working. I’m still tweaking it but wanted to do some gameplay videos. I forgot how really fun this game is. It’s all about nudging. This is one of the best games to learn the subtle art of nudgng on and widely regarded in pinball collection circles. Come see what the fuss is about..

Pinball Showcase: 1967 Gottlieb Hi-Score

This is a game I featured in episode #17 of pinball stories. A recent game I picked up and was sitting in my living room that I’ve been working on restoring. I finally got the game playable and wanted to do a test-stream of my camera rig so why not do a Pinball Showcase? What you have here is a portion of the live stream of me demo’ing the 1967 Gottlieb Hi-Score pinball machine. A surprisingly fun game to play, albeit a rather simple and shallow rule set.

In the video I explain the rule set but I wasn’t immediately able to figure out under what conditions the reward scale for the roulette wheel resets. After playing a few more times I figured it out. If you hit the max payout for A, B or C, it then resets, otherwise it will remember and carry over the current payoff scale from ball to ball AND player-to-player. So this means it’s possible for a player to steal the progress of another player for a larger roulette payout. That’s pretty cutthroat!

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