Inside Dan Ferguson’s “Lone Star Pinball Museum”

A friend and a true legend in the pinball community passed away this week. Dan Ferguson, owner of the “Lone Star Pinball Museum” and one of the iconic enthusiasts in the region. Dan was a fixture at all the Texas pinball shows and had one of the most amazing collections of games and memorabilia anywhere. Eight years ago was one of the first times I got a chance to take a peek inside his infamous private museum, that was typically only open by invitation (and was an inspiration for our own PinChurch facility).

Here’s is a video I shot of a quick walk-thru of his amazing place. We miss you Dan!

First Look: A vintage 1940 flipperless woodrail pinball

For more than a year, I’ve been drooling over a particular pinball backglass I’d seen in a private collection.  I finally managed to pick up the machine and am pretty excited.  This is another daunting project: A pre-flipper, pre-WWII vintage woodrail pinball game from Genco.  “Big Town” was produced in 1940, and as you can see from the backglass, it’s got a beautiful vintage art-deco look.  To me a perfect example of how glorious pinball art can be.



Here are some still images of the machine:

A quick peek at a very cool pinball collection in Texas [pbh10]

Just north of Houston, there’s a very cool guy named Dan who has been collecting pinball machines for many, many years.  We came out to visit him this year while in town for the Houston Arcade Expo and I took a moment to grab the video camera and make quick walk-through of his museum, which houses hundreds of games from the earlier pinball eras.

I know it would look better if all the machines were fired up, but we weren’t staying long and I didn’t want to trouble him to flip everything on.  But you can get a feel for how many old games are in the museum, covering the earliest of eras in the 1800s and early 1900s to pre-flipper woodrails, bingo machines, EM woodrails and lots of classic 60s and 70s electro-mechanical games.  Distinctions in the collection include all four versions of Bally’s classic “Fireball” game, Atari’s gargantuan game “Hercules”,  rarities like “Spectrum”, “Asteroid Annie” and “Solar Fire”, and many very early games for which there’s very little information on how many were made.  There are also lots of vintage EM baseball, shooting and aviation games.  I plan to post more details in the future including some high-quality pictures.  Once again, a huge thanks to Dan for his hospitality!