Sega/Stern South Park – fixing opto/ball trough issues

In this video I pull a game off route and work on it. Discussing the unusual playfield hardware used by Sega/Stern. There was a problem with the optos in the ball trough causing problems making the game kick balls out onto the playfield unexpectedly. The game displays “too many balls” when there is the proper number installed.

Diagnosing and replacing a burned-out coil on Gottlieb Card Whiz

This is a short series of videos on fixing a Gottlieb Card Whiz (two player version of Royal Flush) EM pinball machine that was having problems advancing the next player/ball. Upon investigation I discovered a coil that was burned and fell apart when I pulled it out of the assembly. I’ll go over replacing the coil.

2018 Houston Arcade Expo (pre-show-opening) Walk-Through

This is a quick walk-thru of the 2018 Houston Arcade Expo (HAAG) before the show opens. To give you an idea of how much work is involved in getting everything set up. I apologize for the shaky camera. And it looks like YouTube has disabled their video stabilization ability (boo!) so I can’t stabilize it online. Anyway, I hope you enjoy this short video!

Fixing drop targets on Stern pinball games (World Poker Tour)

I recently was tasked with fixing up a Stern World Poker Tour that had come off route. The game had a number of issues, the first of which was that certain targets would not reset. They would pop-up, but fall back down. Some research indicated this was a known issue that Stern released a service bulletin to address. But I soon found out my problem was deeper than that, and several things were wrong, including a broken bolt holding a coil stop, and the wrong plunger assembly used on one of the drop targets. In this video series, I outline how I identified and solved the problem. Here are some pictures of the work that was done to fix the broken bolt.

Upgrading Gottlieb System 80 MPU board with new battery pack

One of the first things you have to do when you get an original Gottlieb System 80 game is deal with their on-board NiCad battery pack, if it has not already been addressed. Gottlieb installed these batteries on the actual MPU board itself and like on other games, it’s a common cause of serious problems with the game. The batteries begin to leak after awhile, releasing electrolytes that corrode the MPU board and the components on it. This can happen even if you don’t see any obvious leaks. The batteries need to be replaced. There are a few options you have to do this: a remote battery pack (3 AA batteries along with a blocking diode to keep them from being charged if they’re not rechargeable batteries), a 2032 lithium coin cell, or my favorite, a 5.5v 1.5F memory capacitor. The memory cap will last the longest and will not destroy any components on the board. It will keep a charge for at least a month or more without power. Here’s a video of me adding this fix to a Gottlieb System 80B MPU